Spacer
Skip to content
Spacer

 

 

View or Download Catalog (PDF)

Guided Pathways

RCC 2021-22 Catalog

General Education Outcomes and Educational Programs Overview

Institutional Learning Outcomes

CC faculty have identified five Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) that students should see referenced on course syllabi. These outcomes are essentially skills that have been determined to make students successful at RCC and in whatever lies beyond their RCC experience. Students may be assessed directly for achievement of these outcomes as part of regular course assessments. They include:

  • Communication: Students will engage in effective communication using active reading and listening skills and expressing ideas appropriately in oral, written, and visual work.
  • Critical Thinking: Students will explore, reach, and support appropriate conclusions through the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of information and varying opinions.
  • Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Global Consciousness: Students will recognize and identify equity, diversity, inclusion and global consciousness as it applies to people and the world today.
  • Information Literacy: Students will identify an information need and locate, evaluate, and use information effectively and ethically.
  • Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning: Students will reason through and solve quantitative problems by collecting and interpreting data, and applying mathematical/statistical techniques.
 

Approved Electives

The following courses may be used to fulfill AAS, ASOT-Business, and ASOT-Computer Science degree and certificate elective requirements in first aid and health, humanities, social science, and science disciplines with approval of advisor unless otherwise noted on graduation guide.

First Aid and Health Electives

HE112 Emergency First Aid
HE131 Introduction to Exercise and Sport Science
HE250 Personal Health
HE252 First Aid/CPR
HE253 Wilderness First Aid
HE261 CPR/Basic Life Support Provider
HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life

Humanities Electives

ART115 Basic Design (Composition)
ART116 Basic Design (Color Theory)
ART131 Introduction to Drawing (Value)
ART132 Introduction to Drawing (Line)
ART133 Introduction to Drawing (Mixed Media)
ART204, 205, 206 History of Art I, II, III*
COMM100 Basic Communication
COMM111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
COMM115 Introduction to Intercultural Communication*
COMM201 Media and Society
COMM218 Interpersonal Communication
COMM225 Small Group Communication and Problem Solving
COMM237 Communication and Gender*
COMM270 Argument and Debate
ENG104 Introduction to Literature (Fiction)
ENG105 Introduction to Literature (Drama)
ENG106 Introduction to Literature (Poetry)
ENG107 World Literature: Ancient to Classical*
ENG108 World Literature: Medieval to Renaissance*
ENG109 World Literature: Enlightenment to Modern*
ENG201, 202 Shakespeare I, II
ENG204 Survey of English Literature: Medieval to Renaissance
ENG205 Survey of English Literature: 18th Century to Romantic
ENG206 Survey of English Literature: Victorian to Modern
ENG253 Survey of American Literature: Colonial
ENG254 Survey of American Literature: 19th Century
ENG255 Survey of American Literature: 20th Century
ENG257 African American Literature*
ENG260 Introduction to Women Writers*
ENG275 The Bible as Literature
HUM101 Introduction to Humanities: Classical to Medieval*
HUM102 Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to Enlightenment*
HUM103 Introduction to Humanities: Romanticism to 20th Century*
HUM215 Native American Arts and Cultures: Eskimo/Inuit*
HUM216 Native American Arts and Cultures: First Nations of the Northwest Coast*
HUM217 Native American Arts and Cultures: Nations of the Plains*
HUM218 Native American Arts and Cultures: Nations of the Southwest*
HUM219 Native American Arts and Cultures: Peoples of Mexico*
IS110 Introduction to International Studies*

MUS101 Music Fundamentals
MUS105 Music Appreciation
MUS108 Music in World Cultures
MUS111, 112, 113 Music Theory I, II, III
MUS114, 115, 116 Aural Skills I, II, III
MUS201 Exploring Music: Introduction to Music History
MUS205 History of Jazz
MUS206 Introduction to Rock Music
MUS261 History of Western Music I: Ancient to Baroque
MUS262 History of Western Music II: Classical and Romantic
MUS263 History of Western Music III: 20th Century to Modern Day
MUS264 History of Rock I: The Roots of Rock
MUS265 History of Rock II: Rock’s Golden Age
MUS266 History of Rock III: Heavy Metal to Hip Hop
PHL101 Philosophical Problems
PHL102 Ethics
PHL103 Critical Reasoning
REL201 World Religions *
REL243 Nature, Religion and Ecology
SPAN201, 202, 203 Second Year Spanish I, II, III *
TA141, 142, 143 Fundamentals of Acting I, II, III
TA144, 145, 146 Improvisational Theater
TA153 Theater Rehearsal and Performance

Social Science Electives

ANTH110 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology *
ANTH150 Introduction to Archaeology
CJ100 Foundations and Ethics in Criminal Justice
CJ110 Introduction to Law Enforcement
CJ120 Introduction to the Judicial Process
CJ130 Introduction to Corrections
CJ200 Introduction to Criminology **
CJ201 Juvenile Delinquency **
CJ214 Criminal Justice and Diversity
CJ220 Law: Substantive Law and Liability
CJ221 Law: Constitutional Criminal Procedure
CJ243 Drugs, Crime and Addiction **
ECON201 Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON202 Introduction to Macroeconomics
GEOG100 Introduction to Physical Geography ****
GEOG110 Introduction to Human Geography *
GEOG120 World Regional Geography
HST104 World Civilizations: Prehistory - Middle Ages
HST105 World Civilizations: Byzantium – Present *
HST201 U.S. History through Reconstruction *
HST202 History: Post-Reconstruction - Present *
HST259 The Chicano/Latino Historical Experience * **
PS201 U.S Government: Institutions and Policy

PS202 U. S. Government: Ideologies and Political Participation
PS203 State and Local Government
PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations
PSY119 Psychology of Personal Growth
PSY201, 202 General Psychology I, II
PSY215 Life Span Human Development
PSY219 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
PSY231 Human Sexuality
SOC204 Introduction to Sociology*
SOC205 American Society*
SOC213 Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.*
SOC218 Sociology of Gender*
SOC221 Juvenile Delinquency**
SOC225 Social Problems and Solutions
SOC228 Environment and Society
SOC230 Introduction to Gerontology
SOC235 The Chicano/Latino Historical Experience***
SOC243 Drugs, Crime and Addiction**
SOC244 Introduction to Criminology**

Science Electives

BI100SB Biology of Human Body Systems (no lab)
BI101, 102, 103 Introduction to Biology I, II, III (non-majors) w/lab
BI121, 122 Elementary Anatomy and Physiology I, II w/lab
BI211, 212, 213 General Biology I, II, III w/lab
BI231, 232, 233 Anatomy and Physiology I, II, III w/lab
BI234 Microbiology w/lab
CHEM104 Introductory Chemistry w/lab and Recitation
CHEM105 Introductory Organic Chemistry w/lab
CHEM106 Introductory Biochemistry w/lab
CHEM221, 222, 223 General Chemistry I, II, III w/lab
CS161U Computer Science I (C++)
CS162U Computer Science II (C++)
CS234U Object Oriented Programming in C++
ENV111 Introduction to Environmental Science (no lab)
G100 Fundamentals of Geology (no lab)
G101, 102, 103 Introduction to Geology I, II, III w/lab
GS104 Physical Science: Physics w/lab
GS107 Physical Science: Astronomy w/lab
GS108 Physical Science: Oceanography w/lab
GS170 Regional Field Studies w/lab ***
NFM225 Nutrition
PH201, 202, 203 General Physics I, II, III w/lab
PH211, 212, 213 General Physics (Calculus Based) I, II, III w/lab

* Fulfills cultural literacy requirement for the Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree.
** Indicates dual-numbered courses. Only one course can be counted for credit.
*** One field course allowed to meet program requirements.
**** GEOG100 transfers to Southern Oregon University as a non-lab science exploration course.


Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer

The Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree clearly defines a program of study designed for students who intend to transfer to an Oregon university. By completing degree requirements (and major prerequisites if applicable) students will qualify for junior standing for registration purposes upon admission to any university in the state system.

The Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree can be earned by meeting the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete a minimum of 90 term credits of college-level courses (a maximum of 12 career and technical credits are allowed) with a minimum grade of “C.”
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of "C."
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.

General Education Outcomes

The Higher Education Coordinating Commission (HECC) has approved general education outcomes for foundational and discipline courses selected to fulfill AAOT requirements. All courses listed meet those identified outcomes. Upon successful completion of the AAOT degree, students having taken these courses will be able to do the following:

ARTS & LETTERS:
Interpret and engage in the Arts & Letters, making use of the creative process to enrich the quality of life; and
Critically analyze values and ethics within a range of human experience and expression to engage more fully in local and global issues.

CULTURAL LITERACY:
Identify and analyze complex practices, values, and beliefs and the culturally and historically defined meanings of difference.

INFORMATIONAL LITERACY:
Formulate a problem statement;
Determine the nature and extent of the information needed to address the problem;
Access relevant information effectively and efficiently;
Evaluate information and its source critically; and
Understand many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information.

MATHEMATICS:
Use appropriate mathematics to solve problems; and
Recognize which mathematical concepts are applicable to a scenario, apply appropriate mathematics and technology in its analysis, and then accurately interpret, validate, and communicate the results.

SCIENCE/COMPUTER SCIENCE:
Gather, comprehend, and communicate scientific and technical information in order to explore ideas, models, and solutions and generate further questions;
Apply scientific and technical modes of inquiry, individually, and collaboratively, to critically evaluate existing or alternative explanations, solve problems, and make evidence-based decisions in an ethical manner; and
Assess the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies and critically examine the influence of scientific and technical knowledge on human society and the environment.
Contact the Counseling/Advising Department for more specific information on programs and coursework.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
Apply analytical skills to social phenomena in order to understand human behavior; and
Apply knowledge and experience to foster personal growth and better appreciate the diverse social world in which we live.

SPEECH/ORAL COMMUNICATION
Engage in ethical communication processes that accomplish goals;
Respond to the needs of diverse audiences and contexts; and
Build and manage relationships.

WRITING
Read actively, think critically, and write purposefully and capably for academic and, in some cases, professional audiences;
Locate, evaluate, and ethically utilize information to communicate effectively; and
Demonstrate appropriate reasoning in response to complex issues.

The Associate of Science Oregon Transfer – Business

The Associate of Science Oregon Transfer – Business degree defines a program of study to fulfill lower division general education requirements for a bachelor’s degree at Oregon public universities. It is designed for students transferring to baccalaureate degree programs in a variety of business majors. Those completing the ASOT-Business degree are assured junior level standing and will have met the lower division general education requirements of any public institution in Oregon.

Students should contact the specific business school or program they will transfer to early in the first year of their ASOT-Business program to be advised about additional requirements and procedures for admission to that school or program.

The Associate of Science Oregon Transfer Business degree can be earned by meeting the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete a minimum of 90 term credits of college-level courses (a maximum of 12 career and technical credits are allowed) with a minimum grade of “C.”
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of “C.”
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.

NOTE: If students plan to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree at a four-year school, they must have a proficiency in a foreign language regardless of when they graduated from high school or equivalency program.

Students should check with the institution to which they intend to transfer, as certain majors may require additional coursework toward graduation.

Associate of Science Oregon Transfer — Computer Science

The Associate of Science Oregon Transfer – Computer Science degree defines a program of study to fulfill lower division general education requirements for a bachelor's degree at Oregon public institutions. It is designed for students transferring to baccalaureate degree programs in computer science or software engineering. Those completing the ASOT Computer Science degree are assured junior level standing and will have met the lower division general education requirements of any public Oregon university.
Students should use the ASOT-Computer Science university-specific degree requirements guide for specific transfer requirements for individual schools. See an advisor for more information.

The Associate of Science Oregon Transfer – Computer Science degree can be earned by meeting the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program
  • Complete a minimum of 90 term credits of college-level courses (a maximum of 12 career and technical credits are allowed) with a minimum grade of “C.”
  • Complete any required prerequisites.
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.

Students who have graduated from high school or completed a high school equivalency program in 1997 or after must have one of the following requirements for admission to an Oregon university:

  • Two years of the same high school-level language.
  • Two terms of college-level language with a grade of “C” or better (may be first-year language which can be used as elective credits).

Note: If students plan to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree at a four-year school, they must have a proficiency in a foreign language regardless of when they graduated from high school or equivalency program.

Some schools require physics. It is recommended that students contact the specific school early in the first year of the program or use the ASOT-CS university-specific degree requirements guide to determine any additional science requirements and procedures for admission to a specific school or program.

Associate of Science

The Associate of Science (AS) degree is designed for students transferring to baccalaureate degree programs in applied areas. The AS degree allows students to focus their studies in a particular discipline based upon signed articulation agreements with the universities that have agreed to accept RCC students. Students must work closely with advisers in their areas of interest to ensure electives are appropriate.

RCC currently has signed articulation agreements with Southern Oregon University for the following programs: Business, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Digital Cinema , Early Childhood Development, Elementary Education, Emerging Media and Digital Arts, Health and Physical Education, Human Services, Outdoor Adventure Leadership; and with Oregon Tech for Business Management, Computer and Embedded Systems Engineering Technology, Cybersecurity , Engineering transfer programs in Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Renewable Energy, Manufacturing/Engineering Technology, Health Informatics, Information Technology, and Software Engineering Technology.

The Associate of Science degree can be earned by meeting the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete a minimum of 90 term credits of college transfer and career and technical courses with a minimum grade of "C" or "pass."
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of "C."
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.

Students should be aware that if they transfer before completing this degree or transfer in a major not covered by prior agreements, their courses will be evaluated individually toward the transfer requirements of the college of their choice.

Students who have graduated from high school or completed a high school equivalency program in 1997 or after must have one of the following requirements for admission to an Oregon university:

  • Two years of the same high school-level foreign language.
  • Two terms of college-level foreign language with a grade of "C" or better (may be first-year language, which can be used to partially meet the humanities elective required in the Associate of Science degree).

NOTE: If students plan to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree at a four-year school, they must have a proficiency in a foreign language regardless of when they graduated from high school or equivalency program. Students should inquire with their intended receiving institution for foreign language requirements.

Associate of Applied Science

Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in a two-year career and technical program by satisfying the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete all required courses with a minimum grade of "C" or "pass." A complete list of requirements can be found in this catalog under the name of the specific program.
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of "C."
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.
  • Satisfactorily complete general education requirements required in all AAS degrees.

Associate of Applied Science degrees are offered in these areas:

Automotive Technology
Business Technology
Business Technology: Accounting Option
Business Technology: Management and Marketing Option
Computer Support Technician
Criminal Justice
Design and Digital Media
Diesel Technology
Early Childhood Education
Electronics Technology
Family Support Services
Fire Science
Human Services
Industrial Welding Technology
Manufacturing/Engineering Technology
Mechatronics
Nursing
Paramedicine

Associate of General Studies

The Associate of General Studies degree is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire a broad education rather than pursuing a specific college major or career and technical program. The AGS degree includes, in addition to the general education courses listed below, 74-75 credits of lower division college transfer and career and technical education courses. Because of the flexibility of this degree, it may not fulfill requirements for transfer to a four-year institution at the junior level.

Candidates for the Associate of General Studies degree must earn a minimum of 90 credits and satisfy the following requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of "C."
  • Satisfactorily complete required general education courses.
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credits toward the degree at RCC.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year university may select courses within the requirements of the AGS degree that will apply to the following majors at OUS schools: Architecture, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Pre-dental Hygiene.

Certificate programs

Career Pathway, less than one-year, and one year (three to four terms) certificates of completion programs prepare students to enter a variety of occupational fields. To qualify for one-and two-year certificates students must meet these requirements:

  • Be admitted to the program.
  • Complete all required courses with a minimum grade of “C" or "pass.” (A complete list of requirements can be found in this catalog under the name of the specific program.)
  • Complete any required prerequisites with a minimum grade of "C."
  • Complete a minimum of 12 credits toward the certificate at RCC.
  • Satisfactorily complete general education requirements required in all certificate programs.

The following certificates are awarded:

Alcohol and Drug Counselor
Automotive Specialist
Basic Health Care
Business Assistant
Manufacturing/Engineering Technology: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Technician
Dental Assistant
Design and Digital Media
Diesel Specialist
Early Childhood Education
Electronics Technician
Embedded Systems Technician
Emergency Medical Services
Family Support Services
High Technology Studies
Industrial Welding Technology
Industrial Welding Technology: Aluminum Boat Welder
Massage Therapy
Mechatronics: Mechatronics Specialist
Mechatronics: PLC Programming
Medical Assistant
Medical Office Assistant
Pharmacy Technician
Practical Nursing
Renewable Energy Technician

Career Pathways

To qualify for less than one-year certificates or Career Pathway certificates, students must meet the same requirements as outlined above with these exceptions:

  • General education requirements may vary from those listed above.
  • Complete at least 25 percent of the total credits at RCC.

The following less than one-year or Career Pathway certificates are awarded:

Business Assistant: Business and Information Specialist
Business Assistant: Customer Service
Business Assistant: Retail Sales and Service
Business Assistant: Small Business Management
Computer Support Technician: Computer Software Specialist
Design and Digital Media: Adobe ® Applications Technician
Design and Digital Media: Social Media Technician
Design and Digital Media: UI-UX Technician
Design and Digital Media: Video Production Technician
Early Childhood Education (Basic)
Early Childhood Education (Intermediate)
Emergency Medical Services: Emergency Medical Technician
Family Support Services
Fire Science: Firefighter
Industrial Welding Technology: GTAW Welder
Industrial Welding Technology: SMAW Welder
Industrial Welding Technology: Welder’s Helper
Industrial Welding Technology: WIRE Welder
Massage Therapy: Entry-Level Therapist
Manufacturing/Engineering Technology: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Operator
Mechatronics: Fluid Power Specialist
Mechatronics: Maintenance Technician
Mechatronics: Power Transmission
Mechatronics: Production Technician
Medical Assistant: Phlebotomy

Career Pathway certificates of completion differ from traditional academic programs in that they are milestones on the path to degrees or certificates and are not eligible for commencement exercises. These completions will be noted on students' transcripts.

Career Pathway Certificates focus on attaining certificates and degrees that lead to high-demand occupations and higher wages. A key component of Oregon’s overall education, workforce development, and economic development strategies, Career Pathway Certificates support transitions for students coming to community college to reach their goals:

  • High school to post-secondary education.
  • Pre-college (ABE/GED/ELA/AS) preparation.
  • Industry experience, workforce skills, and degree upgrades.
  • Career seekers and changers.
  • Transferring from community college to university.

Career Pathways provide opportunities to earn short-term certificates (12-44 credits) that prepare students for specific career opportunities. Career Pathway certificates can lead to completion of one-year certificates, two-year Associates degrees, Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees, and employment. Students determine what path to take and work at their own pace to reach their career goals. See an academic advisor for more information.

Focus awards

Focus awards recognize student achievement in certain lower division collegiate interest areas and provide a way for students to deepen their knowledge of a particular subject. RCC focus awards consist of at least 18 credits, contain required core courses that must be completed at RCC, and are designed to complement the Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree, Associate of Science degrees, and/or the Oregon Transfer Module. Credits earned may transfer to a variety of programs at four-year colleges or universities as elective credits, program requirements, and/or graduation requirements for the receiving institution. Focus awards are developed and maintained by faculty within academic departments. They do not have official sanction or approval of the state and do not appear on student transcripts. RCC currently has one approved focus award in Sustainable Community Development (see Programs of Study section).

Cooperative Work Experience (CWE)

Allows students to earn hands-on experience in their major area of study with local businesses while earning college credit. Cooperative Work Experience may be financial-aid eligible if it is part of an aid-eligible program. A maximum of 24 Cooperative Work Experience credits can be applied toward a degree and a maximum of 12 credits toward a certificate unless otherwise noted. Cooperative Work Experience credits must be taken within an approved program of study. Check with program advisers for additional information.

Practicum/employment considerations
Students in such programs as Criminal Justice, Early Childhood Education, Human Services, or Nursing who have criminal records or certain physical limitations may be excluded from or limited by employers in some practicum or clinical experiences. Students should be aware that a criminal history may be a barrier to future employment. In addition, some employers may not be able to accommodate certain physical limitations in filling positions. Students with concerns about these issues should speak directly to the department chair or program coordinator.

Non-Credit Training Certificates

RCC currently offers two non-credit training certificates, which provide students with short-term training opportunities for jobs in high demand locally:

  • Commercial Truck Driving
  • Certified Production Technician

To contact the Continuing Education and Workforce Development office by phone, at www.roguecc.edu click on Directory and for Department, select Continuing Education.

Apprenticeships

Apprenticeship programs at Rogue Community College are your path to many great careers. RCC offers programs that combine part-time classroom instruction and full-time on-the-job training. Programs are competitive and include an application process and committee approval.

Earn as you learn
Apprentices usually begin at half the salary of journey workers who have completed their training and have industry certification. Apprentices receive pay increases as they learn to perform more complex tasks. When they become journey workers, they increase their chances of finding a well-paying job in industry and may become supervisors or go into business for themselves.

Construction Trades, General Apprenticeship

  • • HVAC
    • Plumber
    • Sheet Metal
    • Assembler, Pre-engineered Metal Buildings
    • Construction Trades Apprenticeship students can also earn Certificates and AAS degrees in all three Construction Trades programs.

Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies

• Limited Maintenance Electrician
• Inside Electrician
• Manufacturing Plant Electrician
• Sign Assembler/Maker

Electrician Apprenticeship students can also earn AAS degrees in all four Electrician programs, and Certificates in

  • Inside Electrician
  • Manufacturing Plant Electrician
  • Sign Maker/Erector

Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology

  • Airframe and Power Plant Technician
  • Boiler Operator and Repairer
  • Millwright

Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology Apprenticeship students can also earn AAS degrees and Certificates in all three Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology Apprenticeship programs.

As an apprentice, you will:

  • Learn to repair, install and maintain a variety of projects using trade-specific tools and techniques.
  • Comply with current building codes.
  • Comply with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.
  • Earn a Certificate of Completion and journey card from the Bureau of Labor and Industries.
  • Have the opportunity to earn an Associate of Applied Science or Certificate by completing general education courses.
Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What is Apprenticeship?
A. Apprenticeship is not just a job, but a career opportunity! Apprenticeship is a combination of on the job training and classroom training. When they become journey workers earning a journey wage, they are able to give back to the industry by training other apprentices or even teaching apprenticeship classes.

Q. How long must I serve as an apprentice?

A. Typically, apprenticeships last two to five years, depending on industry requirements.

Q. How do I receive my on-the-job training?
A. Once you are selected as an apprentice, the employer has promised to provide you training in all of the work processes according to the apprenticeship standards. The employer and the instructor evaluate progress and make recommendations to the apprenticeship committee regarding your advancement in the program.

Q. Can I expect steady work as an apprentice?

A. The employer makes every effort to employ the apprentice at least 40 hours a week.

Q. How do I apply for an apprenticeship program?

A. Individual apprenticeship construction committees notify the public when accepting applications. Apprenticeship announcements are posted at Bureau of Labor and Industries´ (BOLI) offices, local schools, community colleges, Oregon Employment Department offices, and community organizations. Announcements contain the details about the application process. For the industrial committees, employers hire and promote from within and then refer their candidates to the Apprenticeship Office.

Q. How long must I wait for an opening?

A. The waiting period varies by industry and may last from two weeks to two years. It is a competitive process and it´s not unusual for people to apply more than once. The apprenticeship coordinator reviews applications for minimum qualifications. Qualified construction applicant’s applications are ranked either by an interview, or a random drawing. The applicant is placed on a qualified list called a pool of eligibles, in order of their ranking. Industrial applicants are sponsored by an employer and must meet the minimum qualifications listed in the appropriate apprenticeship standards.

Q. How much pay does an apprentice receive?

A. Although it varies from industry to industry, the average starting wage of an apprentice is 40 to 50 percent of a journey workers rate of pay. Apprentices usually earn a five percent raise every six months if they meet the total work and school hour requirements, and their on-the-job training and school performance is satisfactory.

Q. Are apprentices required to attend school?

A. Apprentices must attend related classroom training along with on-the-job-training experience. Most programs require at least 144 hours of school per year. This usually works out to one or two evenings per week during the regular school year. Like other aspects of apprenticeship, the local committee determines the related training requirements according to industry standards. Apprentices can earn credit towards an associate degree at a community college for classroom hours or for the completion of an apprenticeship program.

Q. Are there age limits for apprentices?
A. Each industry establishes its own minimum age requirement, although the typical minimum age is 18. Except in very limited situations, there are no upper age limits on apprentices.

Q. What are the minimum educational requirements for apprenticeship?
A. Apprenticeship programs require applicants to have a high school diploma or GED certificate. Some occupations also require one year of high school algebra with a “C” or better or a placement process placing the applicant in Math 65 or higher or a college transcript with a “P” in Math 60, Math 63 or higher.

Q. Who pays for the classroom training?
A. It varies among different occupations, industries and employers. In some cases, apprentices pay the cost of related training. In other cases, industry pays training costs.

Q. What other costs must be paid by the apprentice?

A. Costs vary by program. Apprentices must have reliable transportation to get to the job and perform work-related errands. Many programs require the apprentice to provide a basic tool kit and/or appropriate work clothes and safety equipment, as well as books for the classes.

Q. Can I use veterans´ benefits as an apprentice?
A. If eligible, an apprentice may use veterans´ benefits while registered in an apprenticeship program.

Q. How do I prepare for apprenticeship?
A. Today´s competitive industries require employees who are able to perform technical tasks, exercise good judgment, and possess a strong work ethic. The importance of a well-rounded high school education cannot be over emphasized. A strong background in math and science is important. Good attendance is a necessity.

For more information, contact the Apprenticeship Department at 541-956-7184.

Courses that meet General Education Requirements

General Education requirements Career Pathway Certificates  Certificates of Completion Less than one year Certificates of Completion One year  Certificates of Completion Two years  Associate of Applied Science Associate of General Studies
Credits 12-44
credits
12-44
credits
45-60 credits 61+ credits.  90-100 credits
90 credits
Purpose     Milestone for career, related to other certificates and/or degrees. Milestone for career, related to other certificates and/or degrees. 2 year CTE degree (for employment), and labor market need. Combination of education and career goals - not guaranteed to transfer.
      General Education General Education General Education General Education
Writing     3-4 credits: BT113, WR115 or higher 3-4 credits: BT113, WR115 or higher 3-4 credits:
BT113, WR115 or higher
4 credits:
WR121
Communication         3-4 credits:
COMM100, COMM111, COMM115 or COMM218
3-4 credits/1 course:
COMM100, COMM111, COMM115, COMM218
Alternative to Writing/Communication above     N/A N/A 7-8 credits writing:          WR115 and WR121 OR BT113 and BT114  
Math     4 credits/1 course:
BT160, MTH63, MTH60 or higher level math
4 credits/1 course:
BT160, MTH63, MTH60 or higher level math
4 credits/1 course:
BT160, MTH63, MTH60 or higher level math
4-5 credits/1 course:
Math 105 or higher
Human Relations     3 credits:
PSY101 or BT101
3 credits:
PSY101 or BT101
3 credits:
PSY101 or BT101 or ES205
3 credits:
PSY101 or BT101
LIB127     N/A N/A 1 credit/course 1 credit/course
Demonstrated computer literacy     0-4 credits:
CIS120 or documented proficiency within the past ten years
0-4 credits:
CIS120 or documented proficiency within the past ten years
0-4 credits:
CIS120 or documented proficiency within the past ten years
0-4 credits:
CIS120 or documented proficiency within the past ten years
Arts & Letters (Humanities)           3-4 credits / no more than 9 credits
Social Science           3-4 credits/ no more than 9 credits
Science/Computer Science           4-9 credits (lab is required)
Cultural Literacy            
1st Aid/CPR/HPER         1-3 credits 3-4 credits/ no more than 9 credits
CWE/Practicum/Clinical         3 credits  
Electives/Content Area Electives/Content varies to meet total required credits.
continued...
General Education requirements Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) Associate of Science (Articulated) Associate of Science Oregon Transfer: Business Associate of Science Oregon Transfer: Computer Science
Oregon Transfer Module (OTM)
Credits 90-100 credits 90-100 credits
90 credits
90 credits 45 credits
Purpose Guaranteed transfer to all Oregon schools with junior standing. guaranteed transfer, with junior status, to specified 4 year partner via articulation Guaranteed transfer to all Oregon schools with junior standing. Guaranteed transfer to all Oregon schools with junior standing. General education subset of AAOT.
  General Education General Education General Education General Education General Education
Writing 8 credits:
WR121 and WR122 or WR227
8 credits:
WR121 and WR122 / WR227
8 credits:
WR121 and WR122 or WR227
8 credits:
WR121 and WR122 or WR227
8 credits:
WR121 and WR122 or WR227
Communication 4 credits/1 course:
COMM111, COMM115, COMM218
4 credits/1 course:
COMM111 or COMM218 or COMM225
3-4 credits/1 course:
COMM100, COMM111, COMM115, COMM218
3-4 credits/1 course:
COMM100, COMM111, COMM115, COMM218
4 credits/1 course:
COMM111, COMM115, COMM218
Alternative to Writing/Communication above          
Math 4-5 credits/1 course:
MTH105 or higher
4 credits/1 course:                     Math 105 or higher 12-14 credits / 3 courses including one statistics course:
(students should consult university-specific information to determine additional math requirements)
10 credits:
MTH251 and MTH252
4-5 credits/1 course:
Math 105 or higher
Human Relations   N/A      
LIB127   1 credit/course      
Demonstrated computer literacy   0-4 credits:
CIS120 or documented proficiency
4 credits: BA131
16 credits:
CS160, CS161J,
CS162J, and CS260
 
Arts & Letters (Humanities) 9-12 credits / three courses from two different disciplines 9-12 credits from HUM and SOC combined/ at least one course from this discipline  9-12 credits / three courses from two different disciplines 9-12 credits / three courses from two different disciplines 9-12 credits / three courses 
Social Science 12-16 credits/ four courses from two or more disciplines 9-12 credits from HUM and SOC combined/ at least one course from this discipline                                    Note: Combined Humanities and Social Science must equal 9-12 credits 14-16 credits/ four courses from two or more disciplines, must include ECON201 & ECON202 12-16 credits/ four courses from two or more disciplines 9-12 credits / three courses 
Science/Computer Science 15-20 credits / four courses from at least two disciplines including science, math and/or computer science, must include at least three lab courses in biological and/or physical sciences 11-15 credits / recommend at least three lab courses in biological and/or physical sciences, courses must be 100-level and above. Science: 15-20 credits / four courses from at least two disciplines, including three laboratory courses in biological and/or physical science. Three laboratory courses in biological and/or physical science. 11-15 credits / three courses including at least one biological or physical science with a lab
Cultural Literacy 3-4 credits/1 course N/A 3-4 credits/1 course
3-4 credits/1 course
3-4 credits/1 course (can be embedded in Arts & Letters or Social Science above) // recommended, not required
1st Aid/CPR/HPER 3 credits
(one or more classes)
N/A   3 credits
(one or more classes)
 
CWE/Practicum/Clinical   N/A      
Electives/Content Area Electives/Content varies to meet total required credits.

View or Download Catalog (PDF)

Guided Pathways

 

×
Intranet E-mail login (staff) RCC SharePoint Marketing Human Resources
×
RCC Foundation RCC Foundation Alumni Application Order official transcripts Update your alumni student record, print unofficial transcripts Make a gift online Reorder a copy of your Diploma Osprey Athletic Schedule Rogue Community Blog 50th Anniversary news Maps and locations LinkedIn
×
New Students myRogue BlackBoard Student Email Campus App Complaint Process RCC Libraries Strategies for Student Success Virtual Student Center