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Money Metals Exchange Scholarship Program (ID 3171)


Scholarship Description

Start Date:
7/1/2017
Deadline:
9/30/2017
Website:
https://www.moneymetals.com/scholarship
Amount:
Undergraduate Student First Place: $2,000
Undergraduate Student Runner Up: $1,000
People's Choice Award:First Place: $500
Description:
Money Metals Exchange, a national precious metals dealer recently ranked “Best in the USA,” has teamed up with the Sound Money Defense League to help qualified students pay for the ever-rising costs of higher education.

These groups have just introduced the first gold-backed scholarship of the modern era, setting aside 100 oz of physical gold for scholarships to outstanding undergraduate and graduate students who display deep understanding of economics and monetary policy.

Contact Information


Eligibility

Gender:
NA
Eligibility:
This scholarship will be open to high school seniors, undergraduate students, and graduate students with an interest in economics, specifically the tradition of the Austrian school. You DO NOT have to be an economics major to be eligible to receive this scholarship.
Special Criteria:
To apply for this scholarship, students should fill out the application form below, provide proof of current attendance at a high school, college, or university (by submitting, for example, a transcript) and upload their current resume and their essay. Essays should be roughly 1,000 words in length and should answer ONE of the following questions:

-How has the Federal Reserve System helped or hurt the American economy?
-Most economists, even those who support private property and free markets, think that money (or monetary services, or money and banking, etc.) is a special good that must be produced and controlled by the government. Do you agree or disagree, and why?
-How do you think the free market would handle money, if there were no government intervention of any kind?
-How could America best return to a gold or bi-metallic standard?